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Nice Town

 
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Desdemona



Joined: 07 Feb 2006
Posts: 183
Location: Lake Wisconsin, USA

PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2006 9:29 am    Post subject: Nice Town Reply with quote

I believe these are Down East's caps, but I had them tucked away. Here they are -- and here's Joe Thompson -- Domestic God.












And then a couple more.

Best. Profile. Ever.


and for some bathtime fun...


I'm being nice here. I have the Satyr somewhere but he'll pop up sooner or later, elsewhere.
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Marwood



Joined: 16 Feb 2006
Posts: 51

PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2006 2:47 pm    Post subject: Re: Nice Town Reply with quote

Shocked Surprised

Note to self: do NOT attempt to eat whilst browsing The McGann Library.
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Down East



Joined: 08 Feb 2006
Posts: 574
Location: Maine & CT, USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2006 8:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really like the layered cut of his hair in this one, and the length--Enhances his curls.

Notice how the BLUE of his eyes won't show in these pics?
Tried to bring up the blue, but it didn't do much good.

Something about the conversion process from PAL or the age of the tape or something. It usually favors one color combo and minimizes another.

Very odd series, wish they'd air it in the states or put it on DVD.
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Desdemona



Joined: 07 Feb 2006
Posts: 183
Location: Lake Wisconsin, USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2006 8:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some spoilers ahoy!

I wish, too, but somehow, DE, with the storyline about little Angelica and the post partum psychosis, and the *way* that Joe's brother treats the baby, I doubt it. It's hard to watch and gripping... perfect for British TV but not so good for the Hallmark Hall of Fame kind of TV we watch here. Yeah, we get a lot of CSI gore and stuff, but I don't think you'd ever see someone shake a baby on American TV.

Watching that part just about killed me, by the way. And it's pretty vital to the storyline, so I don't think they can just edit it out. Sad I had this movie on DVD and gave it up because I knew I'd never watch it again -- but before I did, I saved some of the scenes I liked -- bathtub, satyr, Joe mopping the floor, Joe cooking dinner, and the fight. Wink
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"Bush put both arms round Hornblower's shoulders and walked with dragging feet... Hornblower was the best man in the world and Bush could announce it by singing 'For He's a Jolly Good Fellow' while lurching along the alleyway. " - Lt. Hornblower
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Down East



Joined: 08 Feb 2006
Posts: 574
Location: Maine & CT, USA

PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2006 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

>It's hard to watch and gripping... perfect for British TV but not so good for the Hallmark Hall of Fame kind of TV we watch here. Yeah, we get a lot of CSI gore and stuff, but I don't think you'd ever see someone shake a baby on American TV.<

It did develop into something rather creepy, but that was the point.

Why, do you suppose, Americans wouldn't show this on tv, when compared to the kind of violence that is typically acceptable and deemed appropriate viewing over here?

It's so hypocritical of the producers or whomever.

RE: Nice Town, I think it's more a matter of distribution mostly, rather than---the baby scenes, and American Network tv never picks up British TV dramas. The ones that do: History, A&E, Bravo (used to) BBC America, and limited degree, PBS Masterpiece and Mystery Theatre, and collaborative HBO projects.

The most violent acts imaginable are visually covered on Major Network tv one way or another, if not totally visually graphic, it is insinuated explicitly on tv . The more visually graphic material will be on the PAY movie channels . The major Networks will still not show complete nudity, for one thing, (look what happened with Janet Jackson's Clothing Malfunction at the Superbowl 05! which is so laughable how people were in such an uproar about it, and at the same time sadly hypocritical, as Larry Flint once pointed out. He questioned why it was that naked bodies are to be censored while horrible violence upon bodies is ok to show. There's still a lot of gorey violence shown on network tv.

Nudity no, violence-yes. Wierd.

I can see Nice Town being shown on American TV.

Not the major networks because they only seem to show American shows under their Network name, but the INDY Channel, Sundance, maybe PBS, BRAVO, BBC America, even (OXYGEN like, the---WOMAN TROUBLES CHANNEL!) could easily pick it up and have no problem showing it.

The theme that came across to me, was there's all this dark ugly stuff going on beneath the superficial (happy smile) shiny surface of things. The Nice Town that wasn't so nice. It's something that really should be shown over here, because it's so true everywhere, though these days, things seem to more obviously unravelling. Writers love to write about this stuff, the stuff that lurks beneath the pretty outer surface people convince themselves, isn't there.

Maddy
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Down East



Joined: 08 Feb 2006
Posts: 574
Location: Maine & CT, USA

PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 8:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Do you think the book from which Joe reads to his family at the beginning and the end of the drama---is John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath?

I might be wrong, because I've only seen the John Ford film, and haven't read Steinbeck's book yet.

"[Note: The film ends on a more hopeful and upbeat note than Steinbeck's novel. In the melodramatic novel, there is a bleak and shocking ending unlike the film. After the loss of her stillborn baby, Joad daughter Rosasharn offers her maternal breast, filled with milk, to be suckled by a starving man in a railroad car.] "

I often wondered what Nice Town's director/writer was trying to get across in showing this scene ...which might be a loose adaptation of that scene from Grapes of Wrath.

What do you think?

Was its purpose to show Joe's fascination or wish/need for the physical feminine qualities of nurturing? Or was it merely sexually provocative?


Last edited by Down East on Wed Mar 22, 2006 6:28 pm; edited 3 times in total
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Teri



Joined: 04 Feb 2006
Posts: 473
Location: Sussex, WI USA

PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 11:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good topic, Maddy! Smile


SLIGHT SPOILERS AHEAD!
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I've always thought of that scene as symbolically representing what's to eventually become the main theme of the film--whether or not it's acceptable to answer to a dire need (in the boxcar scene--hunger and perhaps starvation), even though the means to fulfilling that need may not be entirely ethical. It parallels the quandary in which Joe eventually finds himself: whether or not it's morally right to aid his brother and sister-in-law in conceiving a child by artificially inseminating her himself--without the knowlege of his brother--if it ultimately makes them both happy, and answers a need in the end. It poses the age old question--does the end eventually justifies the means? Can a wrong, or two, make a right?

I think the book passage helps validate Joe's feelings to carry out his plan, even though it disillusions him into believing that it's message can apply in a positive way to any given situation.
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Down East



Joined: 08 Feb 2006
Posts: 574
Location: Maine & CT, USA

PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 6:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent analysis, Teri.

Quite a dillemma! And a lot of symbollism in this one. The dream, the train scene, and many others.

>does the ends justify the means<

He sure had to learn he wasn't responsible for controlling everyone's happiness at the expense of his own family and his own happiness too.
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Teri



Joined: 04 Feb 2006
Posts: 473
Location: Sussex, WI USA

PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2006 11:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For some quirky reason this brings to mind a movie I remember from 1974 called The Savage is Loose with George C. Scott (who also directed), Trish Van Devere, and John David Carson (Johnny's son). Probably because it sort of had the same theme going on--does the end justify the means--but with incest as an even more taboo subject.

It's about a shipwrecked couple on an island with their young son, who, as he reaches maturity, begins to become 'attracted' to his mother, being the only woman there. Her dilemma is whether or not she should 'give herself' to him, knowing it's the only way he'll ever know what it is to be with a woman. In the dire circumstances they're in, is that something she should, or shouldn't do?

Ever see it? It wasn't the best film, technically, but it was pretty bold subject matter at the time--even now, really--and very intense to watch, as was Nice Town at times. I know it's a little OT, but I think it's kind of interesting to compare the themes of the two films.
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Down East



Joined: 08 Feb 2006
Posts: 574
Location: Maine & CT, USA

PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2006 4:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I recall something sensational about that movie with George C Scott, and I think Trish Van de Vere was his actual wife? Anyway I never got to see it. Don't know if they ever replay it on tv.

Oh, those ethical dilemmas!

That one seems to have many of those themes of sea writing...small confined place, surounded by the sea, separation from others...
"The theme of separation has some marked effects on a piece of fiction. It makes the people involved seem more vivid, because they are viewed in isolation -- or at least that was my experience at sea. Also, it allows the writer to isolate, hedge in, almost experiment in a test tube with all the larger values and questions so confusedly intermixed with other issues and considerations ashore.--The Theme of coming of age, male bonding or male rivalry, The Microcosm is born of Separation, shared experience, and a limited cast of characters."

I watched THE BOUNTY yesterday, and there was the scene following the munity. Bligh and non-mutineers were cast adrift in the launch. After weeks at sea, the men were starving and had little water....one of the men who was very weak offered to the captain his body for them to eat after he died.

Bligh, all scruffy and ill himself stiffens and exclaims..."We're not bloddy savages! If we die, we'll die civilized men! " And that was that. There's something to be said about---strict codes of honor.

Now, I'm given to thinking about the story of Pitcairn Island, (which so far, no one has made into a film) with Fletcher Christian's group. They left Tahiti with the Bounty in search of a place to hide and live out their days. They had fifteen men and 12 women aboard in 1790. In 1808 a ship found Pitcairn island and there was only one man and ten women left alive--with over 20 children. Fifteen persons had come to violent deaths. They fought over the women (not enough women for men), some went crazy, some became alcoholics on yam brew and all sorts of ugly things occured, especially murder....a very tragic story.

For Joe, in Nice Town...in his well meaning, he was sort of playing God, going up against the most ingrained ethical boundaries...like Mary Shelly's Frankenstein. Always a set up for tragic consequences.
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